Nano Technology Database Search

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2000-01. Slovick, M. 1/00 Vol 256 Iss 1. Tiniest Web server. PS. P. 38Hariharasubrahmanian Shrikumar, University of Massachusetts."iPic uses a tiny 4-megahertz microcontroller, a 32-kilobyte memory chip that stores Web pages, and a power-supply regulator." (38); the iPics will be embedded in electronic devices so a PC can communicate with it themShrikumar's computer "may soon let our Internet Web browser control almost any AC-powered electronic product inside and around your house." (38); the iPic is believed to be the smallest computer ever built; it costs less then $1; the Web server serves 7,200 hits/hrelectronics, computersThis is an important step for nanotechnology since not only is the iPic a practical use item, but is also cheap to produce.
2000-02. Marston, W. 1/00 Vol 21 Iss 1. Wonder Wear. Discover. P. 46Tyrone Vigo, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Tom Lister, president of Wisconsin Global Technologies; HaloSource; Acordis Acrylic Fibers; David Forrest, president of the Institute for Molecular ManufacturingTextiles are being modified with Teflon to make the fibers stain-resistant; Vigo's polymer (polyethylene glycol) coils and uncoils to release or retain heat and moisture; HaloSource is incorporating N-halamines to fabrics to attract chlorine molecules and kill germs"Tomorrow, embarrassing-and expensive-clothing disasters will be history, because textile designers are teaming up with materials scientists to develop fabrics that remain fresh and wearable regardless of what you spill on them." (46); Vigo created a polymer called polyethylene glycol to regulate temperature; it is "'Nontoxic, antimicrobial, eliminates all odor-causing microbes, antistatic, antiwrinkle, and there's no shrinkage.'" (Lister, 46)textiles, medicineNanotechnology will only serve to enhance these textile processes, allowing for rip-repairing, shape-changing, self-laundering clothing and fabrics.
2000-03. 1/1/00. The thinkers: minds that matter. Maclean's. P. 78Peter Willis, physical chemist, Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Rice University"he [Willis] is doing postdoctoral research with Nobel laureate chemist and physicist Richard Smalley on the production of material made from molecules known as pure carbon fullerene tubes." (78)"'Nanotechnology is the science of the future… It will change all of our lives in the next 20 to 40 years.'" (78)Pure carbon fullerene tubes cost $1,500 to produce per grammaterials manufacturingNanoscience will change our lives in the future, but this article conveys the general uncertainty of how by omitting specifics.
2000-04. 1/1/00. Readers see a future of peace, health and moonbase tourists. ATU. P. 30Kay Kelly Future speculation"Nanotechnology… will transform the world economy; things will be inexpensive and durable. Medical offshoots of nanotech will make immortality a practical goal." (30)None listedmedicine, consumerism, materials manufacturingAgain, the uses of nanotechnology most stressed are medical advances and materials manufacturing that will lead to revolutionized consumer products
2000-05. Tolson, M. 1/1/00. Y2K or not…we made it/Looking Ahead: The wonders of the future are upon us. HC. P. 1Mike Tolson, article author Future speculation"Nanotechnology… will produce devices that reproduce the actions of full-sized counterparts. That means it is completely reasonable to anticipate the injection of millions of nanorobots into the human bloodstream" (1)None listedmedicineNanobots patrolling the bloodstream is one of the most recurring themes in the discourse of nanotechnological goals. Here, nanotech is hailed as perhaps the greatest technological achievement that will come out of the 21st century.
2000-06. Boraks, D. 1/2/00. Innovation: To infinity and Beyond. CO. P. 14XDavid Boraks, article authorFuture speculation"Using nanotechnology, tiny nanobots weighing a few grams could send 100 million eyes and ears to the surface of Mars." (14X)None listedspace explorationNanotechnology would bring an unprecedented degree of fault tolerance to the space program. As the article mentions, even if half of the nanobots sent fail, there would still be 50 million functioning recorders.
2000-07. Howe, Peter. 1/21/00. MIT, Miami Firm in $90M Optical Networking Venture. BG. P. C3G. Robert Tatum, president of Nanovation Inc.; Lionel C. Kimerling, MIT Materials Processing Center directorNanovation "is committing $90 million to create a new research center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology." (C.3)The center "is expected to supercharge local efforts in what is called optical networking." (C.3); "'Microphotonics is the next revolutionary technology'" (Kimerling, C.3)microphotonic/nanophotonic devices - devices and circuits, "which can carry hundreds of times more data at much higher speeds over connections a hundredth or a thousandth the size of a metal wire." (C.3)Communication, computer, electronic devicesSuch a practical use of nanotechnology that is cost-effective and beneficial to a large community will make a favorable example for when nanotechnology research is questioned in the future.
2000-08. Ackerman, T. 1/22/00. Rice University Chemis Sees Big Promise in 'Nano' Initiative. HC. P. 2Rick Smalley, Rice University nobelistThe initiative "will make the funding climate so rich the school [Rice] will become more aggressive in pursuing projects such as its bid to create objects at once thinner than a human hair and 100 times stronger than steel." (2)Smalley said, "President Clinton's proposed nanotechnology initiative should embolden Rice researchers to push forward with more ambitious programs." (2)"Rice was the nation's first university to adopt nanotechnology as a key strategic area for investment." (2)nanotechnology researchMore nanotechnology funding will mean more prestigious universities will begin research programs, and nanoscience will be further legitimized.
2000-09. Fleck, John. 1/22/00. Sandia may get more funds for research. Albuquerque Journal. P. E1Sandia National Laboratories, President Clinton, National Institutes of Health and National Science FoundationIncrease in the budget for Department of Energy Increase in the budget will increase the money for the researchBudget increase for the nanotechnology researchBroad scientific funding initiative by President Clinton. New money could expand the lab's research in nanotechnology.
2000-11. 1/22/00. Clinton Proposes Boost in Technology Funding. HC. P. 2President Clinton"The spending proposal… seeks a $497 million 'National Nanotechnology Initiative' that would finance research into the manipulation of individual atoms and molecules." (2)"nanotechnology research could lead to breakthroughs such as 'molecular computers' that could store the contents of the Library of Congress in a device the size of a sugar cube or produce new materials as strong as steel but 10 times lighter." (2)President Clinton "proposed a $2.8 billion rise in research funding, providing money to study everything from the way molecules move to networks for high-speed wireless communications." (2)communication, computers, materials manufacturingPresidential backing of nanotechnology research will help to make it a more accepted and prominent research area.
2000-12. Saunders, F. 2/00 Vol 21 Iss 2. Molecule Mover and Shaker. Discover. P. 14James Gimzewski, IBM's Zurich Research Laboratory"By manipulating a tiny, electrically charged stylus, Gimzewski has built an abacus of carbon molecules one ten-millionth of an inch wide." (14)Nanotech devices "are the first steps toward a new kind of micro-industry, constructed molecule by molecule." (14)Gimzewski is working on another machine powered by the heat surrounding itmedicine, computers, communication, farmingGimzewski offers chemicals as the solution to the nanobot energy problem. If the appropriate chemicals could be manufactured or discovered, then mass-producing self-sustaining nanobots would no longer be a problem.
2000-13. Boyd, R. 2/3/00. Atom-sized gadgets are ahead. Charlotte Observer. P. 2AWhite House Office of Science and Technology Policy; Horst Stormer, Lucent Technologies; Robert Mehalso, Renselaer Polytechnic Institute; Richard Smalley, Rice University"Lucent Technologies is developing 100-nanometer chips." (2A)"'Nanotechnology will lead to the next industrial revolution'"; "'Nanotechnology has the potential to change the nature of almost every human-made object.'" (WHOSTP, 2A)"'Nanotechnology has given us the tools to play with the ultimate toy box of nature - atoms and molecules.'" (Stormer, 2A)aviation, construction, computers, energyWhile nanotechnology may indeed have the potential to revolutionize all human industries, whether or not it will be feasible to do so remains to be seen.
2000-14. Westphal, S. 2/3/00. Remaking the World One Atom at a Time; Nanotechnology, Manipulating Materials on a Molecular Scale. LA. P. B2IBM physicists; Eugene Wong, assistant director of Engineering for the National Science Foundation; Tom Schneider, National Cancer Institute; Interagency Working Group; Richard Smalley, Rice UniversityMedicine - "So-called smart devices made of drugs coated in layers of nanoparticles could travel to sites in the body to cure localized cancers or lesions. Prosthetic limbs and artificial organs may be coated with nanoparticles to prevent immune reactions against the implants."; Environmental Science - "nanomembranes that will filter contaminants or remove pollutants, or will be able to detect and detoxify contamination with chemical and biological agents." (B.2)"if humans could tell atoms how to arrange themselves and how to behave, many of the properties of a material could be controlled at will." (B.2); "'We'll be able to build anything in the future.'" (Schneider, B.2)"New kinds of microscopes and powerful computer simulation programs developed in the past 10 years have revolutionized nanotechnology." (B.2)construction, information technology, medicine, environmental science, the automotive industry, energy, national security"Leading scientists who met last year at the National Science Foundation said nanotechnology will have a major impact on health, wealth, and security of the world's people and will be at least as significant as antibiotics" (B.2)
2000-15. Piller, C. 2/3/00. A Glimpse of Atomic Scale Computing. LA. P. A1Donald Eigler and IBM physicists; Paul Saffo, director of the Institute for the Future"The scientists demonstrated an atomic-scale circuit by building on a sheet of copper an elliptical ring of pointy cobalt atoms… When they placed an additional cobalt atom inside the ellipse, it transmitted a 'mirage' or faint duplicate, of that atom's electrical state to appear at a second point within the ring." (A.1)"nanotechnology will ultimately pack the power of a supercomputer into a device so small that they could be woven into garments powered by body heat, or injected into a person's bloodstream as super-intelligent diagnostic probes." (A.1)IBM's 'quantum mirage' research "demonstrates that information can travel through solid substances without the benefit of wires." (A.1)computersThis proves that atomic-scale circuits can be built, but not yet in a cost-effective manner.
2000-16. Walker, M. 2/4/00. The Kids' Reading Room; Reading by 9; News Challenge. LA. P. E8Los Angeles TimesContext is a quiz on weekly news events for children. Nano is basis of a question: “In the future, devices may be built from the bottom up, molecule by molecule, through something called nanotechnology. Nano is a prefix used in science to mean: a thousandth of, a billionth of, a trillionth of.” A=a billionth of. "In the future, devices may be built from the bottom up, molecule by molecule, through something called nanotechnology." (E.8)"'Nano' is a prefix used in science to mean: 'a billionth of'" (E.8)Molecular manufacturing. Nano as cultural icon. Nano used in children's quiz shows how it has become part of general knowledge and cultural/scientific awareness.
2000-17. Boyd, R. 2/7/00. Researchers tout tiny tech as the next big thing atom manipulation could change world. DFP. P. 4AWhite House Office of Science and Technology Policy; Horst Stormer, Lucent Technologies; William Warren, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; Richard Truly, director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory"Lucent Technologies is developing a 100-nanometer chip." (4A)"'Nanotechnology will lead to the next industrial revolution'" (WHOSTP, 4A); "'The possibilities to create new things appear limitless'" (Stormer, 4A)"'Nanotechnology has given us the tools to play with the ultimate toy box of nature - atoms and molecules.'" (Stormer, 4A)national security, computers, energyNanotechnology has the potential to change all aspects of our lives through smaller, stronger, faster, more efficient products barely imaginable today.
2000-18. Quinlan, T. 2/14/00. IBM's Atomic 'Mirage' Could Revolutionize Computng Quantum Waves Could Move Data Without Using Wires. CT. P. 2Donald M. Eigler, Hari C. Manoharan, Christopher P. Lutz, and other scientists at IBM's Almaden Research CenterScientists "created a process that uses quantum waves to transfer information from one part of a 'nanoprocessor' to another without relying on any physical connection." (2)If IBM can make the quantum mirage process economically worthwhile, "it could lead to generations of ultra-small processors perhaps billions of times more powerful than today's fastest microprocessors." (2)Right now, Moore's Law holds true, but the pace cannot continue beyond 15 years.computersThis process proves some nanotechnology theory, but is nothing more than an "interesting lab experiment" (2) at this point.
2000-19. Boyd, R. 2/29/00. Tiny Technology big future. MH. P. 1EWhite House Office of Science and Technology Policy; Horst Stormer, physicist; William Warren, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; Alton Clark, Cornell University; Lucent Technologies"Lucent Technologies is developing 100-nanometer chips." (1E); Clark "uses a beam of electrons to write 20-nanometer patterns on a computer chip." (1E)"'The possibilities to create new things appears limitless'" (Stormer, 1E); "The full impact of nanotechnology will be greater than computer chips because it applies to many more fields than electronics" (1E)"Because of the difficulty and cost, most commercial nanoproducts are at least 10 years away" (1E)aviation, construction, computers, energyNanotechnology has the potential to change all aspects of our lives through smaller, stronger, faster, more efficient products barely imaginable today.
2000-20. Wright, K. 3/00 Vol 21 Iss 3. Keepers of Words. Discover. P. 37Deb Burns, Merriam-Webster Inc.Article about addition of words to Merriam-Webster Dictionary. "Breadth of use and 'staying power' are the two principal criteria Merriam-Webster editors use to nominate new words." (37)Merriam-Webster dictionary adds words by use to reflect not prescribe language norms. Nanotechnology has officially made it into the Merriam-Webster dictionaryNo definition listed – nanotech is cited as a passing example. The inclusion of nanotechnology in the Merriam-Webster dictionary helps to legitimize it as a serious science. Also adds to cultural currency and value of the term.
2000-21. Eisenberg, A. 3/2/00. A Wisp of Carbon, Whiff of Gases. NYT. P. G12Stanford University; Alex Zettle and team, University of California at Berkeley; Philip G. Collins, IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research CenterThe two teams have "demonstrated that nanotubes work well as tiny chemical sensors, sniffing out faint amounts of gas rapidly at room temperature." (G.12); "To make nanotubes, carbon vapor is condensed into sheets of graphite one atom thick, which spontaneously adopt a form resembling chicken wire... a sheet spontaneously rolls itself into a long, slender cylinder about a billionth of a meter in diameter." (G.12)with the introduction of female referees, the author says, "Amazing, isn't it, how jobs suddenly attain the complexity of nanotechnology or brain surgery when it's time to open up the ranks?" (8) This is the only mention of nanotechnology in the article.Manufacture of these nanotubes may be cheap because of their simplicity.electronics, computers"'The experiments suggest we can use gases to control the properties of nanotubes on the molecular scale'" (Collins, G.12)
2000-22. Hines, C. 3/4/00. Clinton tries to calm internet fears, calls for study on security. HC. P. 2President William ClintonReport on President Clinton's comments after wide-spread denial of service attacks on major internet sites. Clinton ordered a government study of internet security. Nanotech tied to investment and economic stability – also to privacy and personal security. As part of the speech, "The president… pledged continued support for nanotechnology, the work that allows information storage at an atomic or molecular level." (2)Computers also economic development and investment climate, also tied to security (electronic). Clinton is positioned connecting discoveries in nanotech to future computer integrity and security.Continued financial support as well as public opinion support. Nanotech used to reassure people of secure computer networks.
2000-23. Bell, E. 3/6/00. Danville Teen is Finalist in Top National Science Competition. SFC. P. A16Dilip Bobby Biswal, Monte Vista High School; Intel Science Talent Search"Biswal injected a chemical inside a sample of yeas cells to prevent he telomeres inside the cells from repairing themselves. As the cells reproduced, the telomeres got shorter and shorter." (A.16)Findings about telomeres "could have repercussions for illnesses like heart disease and cancer." (A.16)Biswal reads books like "Nano: The Emerging Science of Nanotechnology"Argument is that people who are influencing other fields are studying and reading about nanotech – nanotech as cultural phenomenonNanotechnology holds the interest of many young intellectuals involved with the Intel Science Talent Search, even if their research doesn't directly involve the field.
2000-24. Van, J. 3/6/00. Big Business Has Nanoparticles Maker Bursting Out of Office Space. CT. P. 2Joseph Cross, chief executive, and Gina Kritchevsky, vice president for technology, Nanophase Technologies Corp.None listedNanophase will benefit from the educational efforts associated with President Clinton's Nanotechnology Initiative"Nanophase has pioneered technology that produces particles so tiny they have different properties than the same material rendered in somewhat larger proportions." (2)medicine, chemicals, materials manufacturing, also investment and economic development Claim is made that Nanophase is alone in the consumer nanotech industry, and as such, is defining the market itself.
2000-25. Hall, C. 3/7/00. Science/ What Makes the World Work. SFC. P. D9Richard E. Smalley, Rice University's Center for Nanoscale Science and TechnologyPromotes Smalley's nanotech websiteNonlisted, promotional Smalley's website offers information on buckyballs, and an order form for fullerene nanotubes.N/AThis article highlights one website, Smalley's, where individuals can go to receive information on nanotechnology.
2000-26. Garreau, J. 3/12/00. From Internet Scientist, a Preview of Extinction. WP. P. A15Bill Joy, chief scientist and co-founder of Sun Microsystems Inc.None listed, speculationJoy agrees that nanoscience has the potential for inexpensive smart machines, but is worried that such technologies could "create the ability to unleash self-replicating, mutating, mechanical or biological plagues." (A.15)None listedDisease, societal impacts This look at the darker side of nanotechnology from an industry leader helps to illustrate how what's being touted as revolutionary and good could just as easily be revolutionary and destructive.
2000-27. Markoff, J. 3/13/00. Technologists Get a Warning and a Plea From One of Their Own. NYT. P. C1Bill Joy, chief scientist of Sun MicrosystemsJoy has "issued an impassioned critique of uncontrolled progress in digital, biological and materials sciences." (C.1)"'The 21st century technologies -- genetics, nanotechnology and robotics -- are so powerful they can spawn whole new classes of accidents and abuses'" (Joy, C.1)Most industry technologists take the stance that any negative effects of a technology will be far outweighed by its positive effects; new technologies will be particularly dangerous because they are being driven by the commercial sector rather than by the militaryDisease -= societal impactsThough Joy is a well-respected industry leader, his doomsday predictions are being scoffed at; this is not surprising given the almost mythical concept of nanotechnology as a universal fix to the world's problems that many people hold.
2000-28. Tasker, F. 3/16/00. Doctors make the internet a controversial medical tool. Miami Herald. P. 1ASteve Brown, chief executive, Health Hero Network"By year's end it [the 'Health Buddy'] will be able to directly transmit blood pressure, temperature, blood coagulation, potassium and calcium levels… It will be done painlessly, using new nanotechnology to draw small molecules of blood products through the skin without piercing it with a needle." (1A)N/Aa 'Health Buddy' will allow chronically ill patients to report their status to their doctor daily without an office visitmedicineNanotechnology in combination with current technologies is providing a way to increase patient care while decreasing costs to insurance companies and HMOs.
2000-29. Markoff, J. 3/17/00. IBM Achieves Advance In Memory for Computers. NYT. P. C.2Currie Munce, IBM Research's director of storage systems and technology; Shouheng Sun and Christopher Murray, IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center; Liesl Folks and Andreas Moser, Almaden Research CenterThe scientists "discovered chemical reactions that cause tiny magnetic particles, each no larger than a few thousand atoms, to assemble themselves at precise intervals like a company of soldiers coming to attention on a parade ground." (C.2); "the researchers combined iron- and platinum-containing molecules in a heated solution." (C.2)The scientists claimed "that they had achieved a technological breakthrough that could result in disk drives capable of holding more than one trillion bytes of data." (C.2); Nanotechnology may one day replace current microelectronic systemsThe new disk drives will hold more than 100 times the information of current drives; self-assembly is likely the key to successful nanotech work; the scientists have arrayed particles 1/20,000 the width of a human haircomputers"The new magnetic nanoparticles could boost storage densities to as high as 150 gigabits per square inch" (C.2) (current densities top out at 35.3 gigabits/sq in)
2000-30. 3/17/00. Business Digest. NYT. P. C.1IBM scientistsN/AThe scientists "achieved a breakthrough that could result in one-inch disk drives capable of holding 100 times the data of the most sophisticated existing hard drives." (C.1)N/AcomputersGreater storage devices could change the way we view many electronic devices, from computers, to music and video storage devices, making them more efficient, smaller, and cheaper.
2000-31. Markoff, J. 3/19/00. Dr. Frankenstein, Please Call Your Office. NYT. P. 4.1Bill Joy, chief scientist at Sun Microsystems; IBM scientistsIBM's process "permits chemical assemblers to self-assemble tiny magnetic particles into a perfectly aligned array of dots, each composed of several thousand atoms" (4.1)"'The 21st-century technologies -- genetics, nanotechnology and robotics -- are so powerful that they can spawn whole new classes of accidents and abuses'" (Joy, 4.1)The biggest danger and threat is self-replicationenergy, computers, medicine, social implications Despite his warnings, "Mr. Joy believes that within several decades similar advances will lead to incredibly low-cost solar power, vastly more powerful computers and cures for everything from cancer to the common cold." (4.1); Nanotechnology may have the potential to advance or destroy humanity.
2000-32. Flam, F. 3/20/00. Scientists grasping the elements of life/microtweezers can manipulate molecules. PI. P. D01.Yale Goldman, Arjun Yodh, University of Pennsylvania; Stephen Chu, physicist, Stanford University"Laser cooling works by creating what Chu calls 'optical molasses' - lots of crossed laser beams that bounce off individual atoms and slow them down." (D01); Goldman is studying muscle fibers by "grabbing them with optical tweezers and moving them around to try to discern their mechanical properties." (D01)"'To understand the true behavior of a molecule, you have to study it in isolation - something possible only with high-powered microscopy and some kind of fine-scale tweezers.'" (Chu, D01)The optical tweezers can manipulate things without actually touching them; they allow the study of forces acting between individual moleculesDNA manipulation, physiologyNanotechnology is beginning to show results in understanding what makes up the human body and the interactions that are always occurring within it.
2000-33. Amato, J. 3/21/00. Book World; Let's Get Small. WP. P. C.03Joseph A. Amato, authorN/A - book review"Familiarity with the ever-expanding microscopic realms probed by our better and better instruments certainly keeps stoking the imagination about the small and invisible." (C.03)"Where dust was once the most ordinary fact of life and the smallest thing visible to the human eye, however, science and technology have revolutionized our ideas of dust." (C.03)environmentalism, medicineThe author suggests that our fascination with tiny things will be the drive of the 21st century which will lead to new discoveries, and also new fears.
2000-34. Markoff, J. 3/23/00. A New Era In Technology for Computers. NYT. P. C.1Mark Reed, chief technology officer, Molecular Electronics Corporation"a team of American computer researchers and chemists have quietly formed a company trying to open a new era of digital electronics by creating immensely powerful computing circuits bases on trillions of individual building blocks, each no larger than a single molecule." (C.1)Nanoscience "might someday replace today's multibillion-dollar chip manufacturing factories with pure chemical processes growing tiny electronic circuits into vast arrays that make huge memory systems and perhaps powerful parallel computers." (C.1)The Molecular Electronics Corporation was founded, in part, by 3 chemists, a theoretical physicist, and an electrical engineer.computers, electronics, tied to economic development and possible investmentLow-cost manufacturing of nanotech electronics could challenge the semiconductor industry and revolutionize chip-making
2000-35. Valovic, T. 3/26/00. Doubter In the Cyber-Church. BG. P. 5.1Bill Joy, chief scientist of Sun MicrosystemsJoy "recently made headlines with a piece in Wired magazine that warned darkly against uncontrolled progress in genetics, nanotechnology, and robotics." (F.1)The age of the 'Cyber-Church' may be ending as people begin to focus on social considerations of technology's ends.Cyber-Church - a term used to "characterize the quasi-religious fervor that has gripped enthusiasts of the new communication technologies." (F.1)Social implications / aspects of nanotechnologyIf it is true that our technological fervor is cooling, then technologies such as nanotech can expect to meet increasing opposition in the coming years.
2000-36. Piller, C. 4/10/00. Tech Patriarch Sees Need to Keep Robotic, Gnetic Genies in Bottle. LA. P. 3Bill Joy, chief scientist at Sun Microsystems Joy "recently suggested that scientists step back from genetic engineering, robotics and nanotechnology" (3)According to Joy, "Humans are not ready to be gods, so we should pause long enough to think carefully before passing the point of no return with technologies that offer God-like powers" (3)Most industry leaders dismissed Joy's suggestion as "hysterical pessimism" (3)disease, arms control, social implications Even though many recognize the dangers of nanotechnology, its enormous potential is such that humanity is not likely to step away from its power.
2000-37. Powell, M. 4/16/00. Are Humans Doomed? Killer robots, doomsday microbes, computers beyond our control. WP. P. F.01Bill Joy, co-founder of Sun Microsystems; Eric Drexler; Christine Peterson, the Foresight InstituteThe "crusade he [Joy] and a handful of influential scientists are embarked on is… to challenge a scientific culture soaring too close to the sun on wings of wax." (F.01); "Peterson would ask research labs to agree to outside surveillance." (F.01)"'We are dealing now with technologies that are so transformatively powerful that they threaten our species'" (Joy, F.01)The three dangerous technologies are genetics, robotics, and nanotechnology; Drexler's similar theory is the 'gray goo' - "that someone might, inadvertently… manufacture a ravenous and invisible man-made machine or bacterium that would outstrip natural competitors and... turn life to dust in a matter of days." (F.01)environmentalism, medicineEven though many recognize the dangers of nanotechnology, its enormous potential is such that humanity is not likely to step away from its power.
2000-38. Allis, S. 4/16/00. I, Robot Will Self-Replicating Robots Rule Us? BG. P. D.1Bill Joy, co-founder and chief scientists of Sun Microsystems; Sherry Turkle, professor at MIT's artificial intelligence laboratoryJoy warns of technological misuse in a Wired magazine article"machines will probably take over the human race, and soon." (D.1); "Ordinary folk must participate in this conversation about our destiny, says Turkle, because it is too important to leave to artificial intelligence gurus who speak in unfathomable argot." (D.1)By 2030, computers will be a million times more powerful than those of today, and may be capable of creating their own separate robotic species.medicine, cultural shifts, social implications If Joy's vision does not come true, we will still be facing a culture where individuals must embrace robotics in order to survive. Human/robot amalgams will be the norm.
2000-40. Allis, S. 4/19/00. Future Shock? Scientist predicts humans will merge with machines. ATU. P. D6Bill Joy, co-founder and chief scientists of Sun Microsystems; Sherry Turkle, professor at MIT's artificial intelligence laboratoryJoy warns of technological misuse in a Wired magazine article; "machines will probably take over the human race, and soon." (D.1); "Ordinary folk must participate in this conversation about our destiny, says Turkle, because it is too important to leave to artificial intelligence gurus who speak in unfathomable argot." (D.1)By 2030, computers will be a million times more powerful than those of today, and may be capable of creating their own separate robotic species.medicine, cultural shiftsIf Joy's vision does not come true, we will still be facing a culture where individuals must embrace robotics in order to survive. Human/robot amalgams will be the norm.
2000-41. Henry, K. 4/30/00. Entrepreneur focuses on ion beam innovation. Baltimore Sun. no pageWalter Finkelstein, NanoFab, Inc."Like surgeons who use lasers to correct vision or remove wrinkles, engineers ca use NanoFab's focused ion beam machines… to change a chip's characteristics."; "'What my device does is change the characteristics of the memory chip or analog chip or digital chip so it improves, either by speed, increased density or whatever you want to do with the device to make your process a lot better'" (Finkelstein)"'It will save the semiconductor industry, or anybody who's doing this, a small fortune in both time and dollars, so they can improve their process and get [their products] (sic) out faster'" (Finkelstein)The ion beam machines emit a ray 1,800 times thinner than a human hair; NanoFab's customers include the NSA and the University of Marylandcomputers, electronic, military, (economic development and investment ? )"Though NanoFab's machines are designed to work with today's computers… Someday, they could have a ray so small it could be used for 'nanotechnology'"
2000-42. Feder, B. 5/8/00. Switching Gear May Lift Prospects For an Array of Miniature Machines. NYT. P. C.1Robert L. Batter, president and CEO of Cronos Integrated Microsystems; JDS Uniphase; Nortel Networks; Lucent Technologies"Various companies are introducing MEMS-based switches to control the paths of lightwaves through the rapidly expanding networks of optical fiber cables that make up the Internet's backbone. By bouncing the lightwaves off MEMS mirrors instead of running them through electronic switches, networks could improve Internet efficiency." (C.1)As MEMS become more advanced and less expensive, uses for them continue to increase, though still in specialized industries."MEMS have recently shown up in devices as diverse as movie projectors, DNA analysis kits, braking systems and airspeed indicators." (C.1)automotive industry, medicine, electronics, communication technologiesThe perfection and use of MEMS may pave the way for nanotechnology when it becomes available.
2000-44. Manier, J. 5/11/00. Gene Study Spotlights Ear's Speedy Hair Cells. CT. P. 16Peter Dallos, professor of neuroscience and other researchers at Northwestern University"Chicago scientists announced the discovery of a gene that churns out molecular motors for a group of inner-ear hair cells" (16)The discovery "may assist in the design of hearing aids or medical treatments for damaged inner-ear hair cells… Some experts even hope the discovery could provide an engine for tiny machines with industrial applications." (16)The hair cells are believed to be the body's fastest-moving parts; the gene is named Prestinmedicine, computers"The extreme microscopic tempo of outer hair cells may well have uses in the emerging field of nanotechnology, which strives to find applications for small machines I the construction of such devices as microchips or medical instruments." (16)
2000-45. Finley, M. 5/17/00. Projecting immortal technology. ATU. P. D6Michael Finley, article authorN/A - satireN/AThe article humorously looks at combining computers and human tissue to create super-beings.medicine, biomechanical engineeringEven though this is a satirical article, it raises valid issues of what could happen to the host body when injected nanobots malfunction or break down entirely.
2000-47. Barbash, F. 5/22/00. Want an Investment Edge?/ Choose a field of technology and learn all about it. HC. P. 4Eric Drexler; Bell Labs, IBM, Duke U., Caltech, U. of WisconsinNone listedfrictionless ball bearings, powerful semiconductors, computers, microscopic motors, fuel that could power rockets, lifesaving medical devicesNone listedmedical, auto, computers, space travel"So far, while research activity is well under way…no product is close to coming to market." (4)
2000-48. Mattox, K. 5/24/00. Ualbany Has big plans for nano world. ATU.P. E4New York State University at Albany, Institute for Materials Research and Applied Sciences; Assemblyman Jack McEnenyThe Institute for Materials Research and Applied Scientists hosted representatives for "seminars designed to outline IMRAS' nanotechnology capabilities, how to develop research projects in partnership with IMRAS and how to secure federal, state, and private funding." (E4)The University of Albany is reaching out to nanotechnology researchers and businesses in an attempt to bring more federal research money to New York.; "'We want to attract more entrepreneurs, more students, more scientists'" (McEneny, E4)"Scientists are working on nanotechnology projects to develop medical tools, stronger building materials and more efficient computers." (E4)medicine, materials manufacturing, computing, investment, economic development As more federal funding for new technologies such as nanotech becomes available, high-profile businesses and universities will follow the University of Albany's example and try to make themselves attractive candidates for funding.
2000-49. Austen, I. 5/29/00. 'Intelligent Ink' helping scientists create new computer chips. CT. P. 6Jeffrey Brinker, senior scientist who leads Sandia research team; Sandia - a Department o Energy laboratory operated by a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp."putting molecules into a solution that is squirted onto various surfaces with an inkjet printer to form patterns designed by a computer. Once on the surface, the molecules assemble themselves into the desired shapes, with no prodding necessary." (6)immediately: "to build tiny molecular scaffolds called nanostructures" ultimately: "to create ultrasensitive sensors for detecting nerve gas and biological weapons." (6)the transparent solution is called "intelligent ink"business, technology, biology, microelectronicsslowly making progress in nanotech, or at least so it seems
2000-50. 5/30/05. Future View Recharge your Wallet, According to these Predictions. DFP. P. 8AWorld Future Society opinionFuturists being discredited for their silly predictions about things such as nanotechnologyN/ACosmetics – social implications and discussion nanotechnology is being laughed at for trying to solve problems such as baldness, wrinkles, and bad teeth.
2000-51. Fountain, H. 5/30/00. 'Camera in a Pill' Views Digestive Tract. NYT. P. F3Given Imaging of Yokneam, Israel; FDA; Dr. Paul Swain, a gastroenterologist at the Royal London Hospital; Dr. Richard Siegel chairman of materials science and engineering at RPI"The camera takes and transmits several images per second, which are picked up by an array of flexible antennas and a receiver about the size of a personal stereo that are attached to a special belt. The images are stored in memory chips and then downloaded to a computer for viewing, either as still pictures or as a kind of home movie." (F3)pill sized camera has been successfully tested on animals and humans - not the clearest picture but good enough-camera can go places that doctors have trouble getting to -pill is excreted after 48 hours, battery lasts 6 - enough to travel through entire systemmedicalencourages even smaller cameras to be made with nanotech
2000-52. Eisenberg, A. 6/1/00. Unlike Viruses, Bacteria Find a Welcome in the World of Computing. NYT. P. G12Dr. James Collins, a professor of biomedical engineering at BU; Dr. Timothy Gardner, graduate student in Collins' research group; Dr. Stanislas Liebler at Princeton U.; Dr. Michael Elowitz, postdoctoral fellow of Liebler at Rockefeller U. Cellicon (mix of the words Cell, Control, and Silicon) Technologies created by Gardner and Collins" to engineer a circular section of DNA with two genes that inhibit each other, so the first gene is on while the second one is off...Those states can be though of as zero or 1...The gene network is prodded to switch from one state to the other by a dose of a particular chemical or a change of temperature. If the cell is given enough of the chemical...the inactive gene will turn on; by turning on, it turns off the other gene." (G12)"Can living cells be transformed into computers?" (G12)"The system consists of four genes put into a bacterium…a genetic circuit. Each of the first three genes inhibits the activity of the next gene down the line. The fourth gene controls the production of a fluorescent protein, so the pulses of fluorescence indicate the periodic output of the clock." (G12)biocomputing, chemistry, genetic engineeringusing DNA to create smaller computer parts
2000-53. Glanz, J. 6/4/00. Music of the Spheres: 'Carbon Is a Girl's Best Friend.' NYT. P. 4.7Chromatics, an a cappella group from GenevaN/Aa cappella groups sing about scientific things because "The language is so lyrical, and I think it lends itself to poetry." (47) - Lynda Williams"Cuz time rolls on and supplies will be gone of diamonds, coal and petroleum. But nanotechnology can build anything with fullerenes! Carbon is a girl's best friend." (47) - Lynda Williams, Carbon is a Girl's Best Friend (her rendition of Diamonds are a Girl's Best Friend)Entertainment – nanotech in culturenanotech is being sung about for entertainment purposes
2000-55. Lattin, D. 6/9/00. A boundary Blurs/ Digital experts ask how computers affect the human soul. SFC. P. A21Bill Joy, cofounder of Sun Microsystems; Rev. Anne Foerst, doctor of Theology, and ordained Lutheran minister, works at AI Lab at MIT; Ray Kurzweil, sci fi writer; Mitch Marcus, professor of AI at U. Pennstudy robots' behaviors and interactions with humans to perfect themtheologians, Christians, and Jews are studying the spiritual ethics of creating robots that are human-like and have intelligence Kismet and Cog are human robots scientists are studying and perfecting In '50's and '60's AI focused on doing computational calculations; now they are working on making robots more personal and giving them a face and bodyAI, robotics, computers, societal dynamics and social implications of nanotech – including spiritual dimensions of possible inventions.mixing genetics, nanotech and robotics to create the human like robots that mimic our behaviors; has helped in determining what makes us human and have a soul.
2000-56. 6/9/00. Researchers may gain ability to 'grow' tiny computer chips. HC. P. 3Angela Belcher of the University of Texas at Austin; Gary Harris, director of Howard University's section of the National Science Foundation's National Nanofabrication Users Networkusing same idea as oysters use to make pearls to grow miniaturized computer chips: "The sort of molecules that enable germs to identify...their target cells - also bind tightly...to materials...used in high-tech electronics, such as silicon... Once attached to such substances...a viral molecule could serve as a template...for the growth of super-thin threads of semiconductors. In the same way, proteins secreted by oysters or abalones control the arrangement of calcium compounds to create the animals' shells, and cells embedded in a mineral matrix direct the construction of bone." (3)using nanotech to create smaller computers because right silicon seems to be reaching its limit of what it can do. For the past 30 years, number of electronic devices that could fit on silicon chip doubled, now it is slowing down. Pentium III processor has 28 million transistors 180 nanometers wide, need to brig that down to 100 by 2005.computers"It's the first step in integrating biological molecules and inorganic molecules that have technological importance…represents a major technological breakthrough in the field of nanotechnology." (3)
2000-57. Piller, C. 6/12/00. The Cutting Edge: Focusing on technology; Old Idea Inspires Breakthrough Device on a Very Small Scale. LA. P. 1Chad Mirkin, chemistry professor at Northwestern U.; Robert Hamers, chemistry professor at U. of Wisconsin at Madison; Calvin Quate- nanotech expert at Stanford Chad Mirkin is creating a dip-pen nanoplotter to create circuits thousands of times smaller and faster using nanotech: dip nanoplotter pen tip into organic molecules and found 8 identical structures 15 nanometers wide.thanks to photolithography, circuits have gotten down to 130 nanometers wide, but they need to be smaller, so the nanoplotter may be the answer need to bring nanoplotter down to scale of 5-10 nanometers so we can pinpoint genetically linked diseases and antibodies that prevent diseases one nanometer - half the diameter of a DNA strand, the genetic blueprintmedical, computers, nanotech methods"scientists could rapidly test for chemical interactions, identify disease organisms and test their sensitivity to drugs or other chemicals - potentially leading to new treatments of diagnostic tools." (P1)
2000-58. 6/17/00. Technology, Past and Future. CT. P. 26Bill Joy, chief scientist for Sun Microsystems; None detailed – opinion piece Joy believes that nanotech has more power to create destructive machines than constructive No specific data reportedAI, robotics, computers, genetic engineeringPBS show took family and put them in 1900 home living 1900 lifestyle and it proved how great technology is and how much we appreciate it, so while there are risks of tech there is also great potential
2000-59. Brand, S. 6/19/00. Is technology moving too fast? TIME. P. 108terrorist Ted Kaczynski; article author Stewart Brandauthor's opinion, speculationBrand believes technology is moving too fast and will someday rule the worldN/A, author does not use evidence to back up opinioncomputers, biotech, genetic engineering, religion, culturescientific advances in fields such as nanotech and biotech are moving too rapidly and it makes them and the society that they drive unstable. An unstated component of this article is the assumption that nanotech is moving and developing rapidly.
2000-60. Naisbitt, N. 6/19/00. Will low tech replace high tech? TIME. P. 108. J. Paul Getty Center in LA; Terry Erwin, a research entomologist and curator at Smithsonian InstitutionN/A, opinion"Someday nanotechnology may make manufacturing products from raw materials in one part of the world and shipping them to another" (108)No specific data reportedtransportationPresupposition that nanotech will achieve specific goals. Yet, article has little evidence to support the stated goals. Nana Naisbitt believes that in a million years, low tech will replace high tech
2000-61. Lemonick, M. 6/19/05. Will tiny Robots build diamonds one atom at a time? TIME. P. 94President Clinton, Richard Feynman, Opinion – speculationnanotech will be able to create chips, shoes, steaks, medical devices, anything! within 25 years, nanotechnologists expect nanomachines Clinton funded $500 million to nanotech researchmedical, computers, biotech, societal implications, some critics worry that self replicating nanobots will not be able to stop and will take over the body quicker than cancer cells
2000-62. Swisher, K. 6/19/00. Boom Town: A contract with America.com. WSJ. P. B1Newt Gingrich, ex-speaker of the House; Silicon Valley vs. Washington, D.C.; Stanford U.'s Hoover InstitutionGingrich is traveling out west to visit Silicon Valley and VC's (venture capitalists) and tech startup companies to get more info on technologyGingrich believes the upcoming technologies are biological research, nanoscience, and info tech Gingrich has been studying tech since 1960's and has always been tech-savvy believes tech can help save healthcare systembiotech, computers, information technology, healthcareGingrich believes that the government needs to think more about technology right now, and behave more entrepreneurially like the tech companies.
2000-63. Aaron, K. 7/2/00. High-tech man for all seasons. ATU. P. D1.George McNamee, head of First Albany Cos. Inc.Speculation"McNamee is convinced that new energy sources will be necessary to sate electricity-hungry devices." (D1) (such as nanobots) "Fuel cells, robotics, nanotechnology -- 'he [McNamee] was very, very prescient about those things a decade ago.'" (D1)electronics, robotics, energy sourcesNanotech has the best change of being advanced when people with financial backing and technological know-how like McNamee are in positions to make funding and research decisions.
2000-64. Ackerman, T. 7/23/00. Imagine That/ Futurists provide glimpses of tomorrow's possibilities. HC. P. 33Charles Kettering, inventor; Oliver Markley, the UH-Clear Lake professor of future studies; U of Houston professor John Lienhard; Isaac Asimov; U of Maryland physics professor Robert ParkFuturists study the past, finding trends to help predict the future.thanks to futurism Richard Smalley was able to discover buckyballs because sci fi /futurists got him interested in the field of nanotech. FutureFocus 2000 conference will attract more than 800 futurists Leo Szilard got many ideas on the atomic bomb from the H.G. Wells book Things to Comescience fiction, futurism"nanotechnology, the science of the ultrasmall that has become a favorite of some contemporary science fiction writers." (33)
2000-65. Feynman, R. 7/25/00. Building Machines from the Atoms Up. Boston Globe. P. F2article author Chet Raymo, professor of physics at Stonehill College; physicist Richard Feynmann; Mihail Roco, a senior adviser for nanotech at National Science Foundationopinionauthor skeptically talks about how nanobots will assemble into a chair, computer, cancer cell killing machines, "gray goo" to disassemble enemies' things and peopletiny red spider mites, barely visible to naked eye are huge and clear in microscope 10 quadrillion atoms in allmedical, military, computersauthor agrees with Feynmann in that there is no reason why we couldn’t create objects from the atom up "What nature does, we also can do - by borrowing nature's DNA technology." but does not believe that it will be within 30 years, maybe 100.
2000-66. Feeley, G. 7/30. Sceince Fiction and Fantasy; Black Writers, Old and Young, Staking their Claims on the Genre. WP. P. X04Nalo Hopkinson, sci fi writer; Gregory Feeley, book reviewer (article authorN/A book reviewreviews the book saying that it is not very believable and has little evidence to back it upNalo Hopkinson - 1998 novel Brown Girl in the Ring and Midnight Robberscience fiction"Although the novel makes occasional reference to nanotechnology, quantum computers and interstellar travel, Hopkinson has no real interest in science fiction per se. " (X.04) -nanotech is seen as scientific proof for futuristic ideas
2000-67. 8/1/00. Dangers of GNR Technologies. LA. P. 8article authors Devin Thomas of Sierra Madre and T.A. Happenheimer of Fountain Valley Review of Genetic Nanotechnology, Robotic (GNR) technologiesarticle consists of two opinions of GNR - both are skeptics, especially of nanotech, though the first one says it sounds very scary if it is perfectedNone listedGNR technologies - genetic engineering, nanotechnology, robotics, societal implications"Of all the GNR technologies…nanotechnology has the greatest potential for the destruction of our planet - no scratch that - our solar system." (8)
2000-68. Pollack, A. 8/10/00. Researchers Harness DNA for Tiny Motors that Could Widen Use of Genetic Code. NYT. P. C5Bell labs and Oxford U.; Bernard Yurke, a physicist at Bell; Nadrian Seeman, a professor of chemistry at NYU; Nanogen, a biotech company in San Diego; James Tour, professor of chemistry at Rice U.; Andrew Turberfield, a physicist at Oxford; Allen Mills and Friedric Simmel of Bell; Jennifer Neumann, graduate student at Rutgers U. "molecular tweezers: 1) The device self-assembles in open form, with strands B and C having regions that correspond to parts of strand A. 2) Strand D is added, with regions that correspond to the previously unmatched parts of B and C, essentially closing the device. 3) Strand E, more fully complementing D, is added, drawing D away from B and C and reopening the device." (C5) tweezers made from DNA to pick up and move atoms"The number of electronic components that can fit on a silicon chip has been doubling every 18 months or so." (C5) "The space between each letter in the genetic code is 0.34 nanometer…existing electronics technology makes features about 100 nanometers in size, more than 100 times as large" (C5)chemistry - DNA, computers, biotechBreakthrough for nanotech, although article still says it may be at least a decade before it has practical applications
2000-69. Fowler, T. 8/15/00. Smaller is Better. HC. P. 71Jim Tour, CEO of Molecular Electronics Corp.; IBM; Compaq; Mark Reed, Yale physicist; Dick Smith, director of science and technology forecasts for Coates & Jarratt; Rick Smalley; Technology Inc.; Nanophase Technologies"The product [DRAM (computer memory)] will most likely be a combination of existing silicon technology and molecular technology" (71)"They were the first to record electrical current through a single molecule, the first to demonstrate a molecular switch that can turn on and off, and the first to demonstrate a molecular form of DRAM, or computer memory, that would actually hold data for 10 minutes after the power is turned off." (71) government issued $500 million research fund for nanotech earlier in the year computers"Molecular Electronics…may produce working prototypes in the next 12 to 18 months" (71) - building up the company and nanotech's progress "Five years ago, people would laugh at you if you said you believed in that mumbo jumbo of nanotechnology." (71)
2000-70. Powell, K. 8/17/00. Science File/ An Exploration of Issues and Trends Affecting Science. LA. P. 2President Clinton; Edwin Jager, graduate student at Sweden's Linkopings U., Scheffer Meltzer of USC's Laboratory for Molecular Robotics; Kristofer Pister of UC Berkeley lab; DARPAmicrochip technology: "created a flat version of the arm by applying layers of gold and a conducting polymer on a silicon wafer in specific patterns and then etching out desired shapes. Then a 'glue' layer was dissolved to release the 3-D functioning arm...140 arms were made on one quarter of the 10- centimeter wafer: Each arm consisted of an elbow joint...a wrist joint and two to four finger joints, each independently controlled." (2)tracking devices that can be used for sensor ants that will check soil and weather conditions or can be used to track kidsNEMS -nanoelecromechanical systems $74 mil nanoscience research initiative, $495 mil initiative from fed. Gov't medicine, sensor technology, computers"It's always been science fiction, you know, robots in the body…and now it's real. This is one step, one demonstration of the possibilities of microsystems technology." (2) - Edwin Jager
2000-71. Markoff, J. 8/18/00. Scientists Advance on Path to Make Electronics Tinier. NYT. P. C5UCLA chemists; James Ellenbogen, scientist for Mitre Corp.; James Heath and Fraser Stoddart, UCLA chemists; Yale U; Rice U"The catenanes consist of two tiny mechanically interlocked rings created from atoms linked in a circle. The group discovered that one ring can be stimulated to move between two different states - for instance from one angle to another - with respect to the other ring." (C5)"to produce electronic circuitry on a molecular scale." (C5)"Hewlett-Packard…developed a nonreversible switch based on a molecular known as rotaxane." (C5) to make it reversible, be able to turn on or off, they discovered catenanes, a type of organic molecule composed of two interlocking ringselectronic devices"The latest achievement is a significant step toward building a new generation of memory devices and computers that are far more powerful and consume less power than today's microelectronic systems." (C5)
2000-72. Wood, C. 8/21/00. The future: Will it work? Maclean's. P. 12-19George Washington U.; Stanley Williams, director of Quantum Structures Research Institute for Hewlett-Packard LabsNone listedarticle talks about new emerging technologies, like nanotech and its advantageswill not see results of nanotech research for 20-30 yearscomputers, medical, societalmass customization - individuals will be able to customize everything Robo-surgery GMO's to treat diseases
2000-73. Wood, C. 8/21/00. Nanotech: How to play with atoms. Maclean's. P. 26Samy Mahmoud, dean of engineering and design at Carleton U.; Richard Feynman; U. of Toronto; Physicist Alastair McLean at Queen's U.; None listedairplane wings and engine parts, paints, medical nano-devices1981 invention of Scanning Tunneling Microscopeairplanes, medicalarticle author admits that it will be a while before nanobots can run around a junkyard collecting scrapwood and put together a table, but he believes that more practical applications are a definite possibility
2000-74. 9/6/00. New Molecular Switch has Staying Power. ATU. P. D6UCLA chemists; IBM; HP; Motorola"In the future, arrays of billions of circuits would self-assemble by means of chemical reactions, which would make individual circuits far less costly." (D6)making computer parts smaller$500 mil research initiative from President Bill Clintoncomputersmolecular switch created to turn on, off, and on again - breakthrough for creating tiny switches and transistors
2000-75. Chang, K. 9/12/00. Can Robots Rule the World? Not yet. NYT. P. F1Bill Joy, U. of Lausanne, Switzerland; Ralph Merkle of Xyvex, a nanotech company in DallasNone listedthe goal of mindless nanobots is to fight off cancer cells in the bodynanobots would be 1/25,000th of an inchmedicine, robotics, social implicationsthe problem some are trying to solve is making the nanobots self-reproducing, but others think that this is just dangerous
2000-76. Hall, C. 9/18/00. Scientists Use Single Carbon Molecule to Form Tiniest Transistor. SFC. P. A6Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Mike Naughton, a physicist at Boston College; physicist Paul McEun and chemist Paul Alivisatos of Lawrence Berkeley Lab; Eric Wong, physical chemist at UCLA"The transistor works by applying a minute charge to the carbon-6, inducing a single electron on one electrode to hop off, bore through the 'soccer ball' - an effect known as 'quantum tunneling' - and then hop on the other electrode." (A6)"A single soccer-ball shaped molecule of carbon sandwiched between gold electrodes has been fashioned into the smallest transistor ever built, scientists recently reported." (A6)"The new gizmo is the smallest example yet of the circuit- controlling workhorses known as 'field-effect transistors.'" (A6)computers"It could point to a new strategy of memory storage in which a system of nano-scale switches and valves would hold the information." (A6)
2000-77. 9/19/00. Technology Boom Too Tempting for Many Government Scientists. NYT. P. A1Pete Beckman computer scientist at Los Alamos labs in NM; David Pehrson deputy associate director of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Mim John, VP of Sandia's California division in Livermore; Robert Dye of Los Alamos labs; Dave Rakestraw of SandiaNone listedmany high level scientists are leaving government jobs for private startup companies because the pay is so much betterat Advanced Computing Laboratory, 41% left in last year, usually it is about 25% in private companies. Weapons, business and research climate for nanotechscientists are being paid millions of dollars to work on technologies such as nanotech
2000-78. Van, J. 9/21/00. Gold and Silver Mix a Bonanza in Genetic Tests? CT. P. 1Joseph Firca, Nanosphere's chief operating officer; Steven Wolinski, a Northwestern AIDS researcher; Chad Mirkin, a Northwestern chemistry professor"The key to the technology is the discovery...of a way to bind clusters of gold molecules called nanoparticles to genetic probes that seek out and stick to targeted DNA material. This target could be a piece of DNA found in the HIV virus, or DNA from anthrax, tuberculosis or other infectious agents. Once the probe sticks to its DNA target, the gold serves as a beacon that becomes visible when the sample is washed with a solution containing silver, something similar to chemicals used in a darkroom to develop a photograph. The silver binds to the gold nanoparticle to make it appear much larger. The result can be illuminated and seen using a $60 flatbed light scanner. The process is called scanometric DNA array detection." (1)creating disease testing devices using nanotech…Nanosphere already has working models of devices that can detect anthrax and tuberculosis infectionfor 15 years scientists could detect small amounts of DNA but it was too expensive, up to $60,000 for the confocal microscope…now it is less expensivemedical - disease testingLess expensive, more efficient way to detect diseases…the company says it will be about 2 years before they are able to produce and sell a working device
2000-79. Vaughn, S. 9/24/00. Making it; For Technology Wizard, Innovation Is Worth More Than the Cash It Generates Making It. LA. P. 1Bill Joy - co-founder of Sun Microsystems now based out of Colorado; Scott McNealy, chairman and CEO of SunDescribes Joy's successesJoy working on reliable computing to make computer technology less likely to fail, and more enduring 1970's Joy had his start by making changes to Unix open source code improved Java language so that 1.7 million people use it nowcomputers, ethics, societal implications - "science needs a stronger moral code" (1) -Bill Joy"Unlike atomic bombs, this next generation of technology - including killer viruses, out-of-control robots and self-replicating nanobots - may be relatively facile and inexpensive to produce by 'rogue users' as means for mass destruction" (1)
2000-80. 10/00 Vol 21 Iss 10. Twenty things that will be obsolete in twenty years. Discover. P. 84article author Eric Hasseltineopinioncurrent memory devices will be obsolete; Coronary bypass procedures will be done away with, replaced by growing new blood vessels; genetic diseases will be eliminated more easily advances in computer technology double every 18 months - Moore's law Magnetic disks double in storage capacity every 9-12 monthscomputers, medicinetechnologies are advancing rapidly right now, even surpassing Moore's law
2000-81. Fowler, T. 10/6/00. Thinking small is way one firm could hit it big. HC. P. 1Richard E. Smalley, Rice U. professor; Bob Gower -co-founder of Carbon Technologies with Smalley; Dalen Keys, global tech director for DuPont iTechnologies; Dick Smith, director of forecasts in science, tech and engineering for Coates & Jarratt; Rice researchers Jim Tour and Naomi HalasNon listedCarbon Nanotechnologies has contract with Rice U. to manufacture nanotubes with Rice's technology. Carbon Nanotech will then sell out these tiny devices to companies that need experimental parts for computers, drug delivery systems, etc."Nanotubes, 1/50,000th the width of a human hair, conduct heat and electricity better than copper or gold and have 100 times the tensile strength of steel yet a sixth of its weight" (1) price per gram of nanotubes went down from $2500 to $1000computers, medical - drug delivery systems"By 2002, Gower expects the company to be able to produce about 20 pounds per day, and by 2003 or 2004, hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of pounds per week. That would be enough volume to support large-scale manufacturing of products." (1)
2000-82. Brown, J. 10/9/00. Finding some middle ground in a world obsessed with the new and impatient with the old. NYT. P. C4John Seely Brown, head of Xerox's Palo Alto Research Center; Paul Duguid, researcher at UC@Berkeley; Bill Joy, a founder of Sun MicrosystemsNone listed – speculationBrown is tired of people saying that the Internet is taking over the world, and forgetting about physical things "as brick-and-mortar stores give way to clicks" (C4)None listedcomputersJoy predicts that technologies like nanotech could lead to biological disaster and destroy the earth, while Brown laughs at futurists saying that they count "one, two, three, one million." (C4)
2000-83. Fleming, C. 10/18/00/ European Fund Balances Public, Private Duties. WSJ. P. 1European Investment Fund; Jim Martin managing partner of Add Partners; EIF chairman Walter Cernoia; Jacques Lilli, EIF's senior VC officer; Rudy Aernoudt European Commission specialistNone listedEIF is funding technologies such as nanotech and biotech that are overlooked by a majority of funding companies EIF, one of largest VC funds, has $3.4 billion to invest in next three years "67 private banks, who between then held 20% of EIF's capital, complained at the time about the buyout terms, about 20 remain today with a total 10% of the capital." (1)business - VC funding; biotech, new materialsEIF is funding new technologies such as nanotech whereas other companies simply overlook them as being unimportant or risky
2000-84. Wong, S. 10/19/00. Wireless future looks limitless. CT. P. 14Rich Howard VP for wireless research at Lucent Technologies' Bell Labs; Juri Mtisoo, VP of Semiconductor Industry Association; Carl Zetie, analyst with Giga Information Group; Thad Starner, assistant professor of computing at Georgia Institute of TechnologyNone listedworking on improving wireless technology, though they say it will be a while before nanotech will come into playestimated increase to 61.5 mil wireless device users by 2003 from 7.4 mil in 1999 internet, wireless technology, computers"but it will still be a while before truly exotic, molecular-level components will be produced through advances in the nanotechnology field." (14)
2000-85. Knox, A. 10/26/00. Region gets $10.5 Million for Nanotechnology Effort. Philadelphia Inquirer. P. D01.Sam McCullough, PA's secretary of community and economic development; Kambiz Pourrezaei, Drexel U. engineering professor; David Luzzi, U. of Penn materials scientist; Barlet Stein, executive VP of Ben Franklin of Southeastern PennsylvaniaNanotech Center is working on linking corporations to manufacture products and universities and research centers to perfect the technology behind the products$10.5 mil grant for three years from Pennsylvania Technology Investment Authority to fund creation of a Nanotechnology Center "enhancing the performance of everything from weapons propellants to computer hard drives to medical diagnostics" (D01)nanotech promises materials lighter than steel but 100 times as strongmedical, computer memory, economic developmentNanotechnology Center is planning to create a "nanotech valley" in Philadelphia, PA much like Silicon Valley in CA. This does not look promising because the taxes are high and the people's interest is low
2000-86. Mucha, P. 10/28/00. All too human when it comes to thinking up exotic new life forms, the minds behind television's 'Star Trek' Series have long been limited. PI. P. D01. article author, Peter MuchaN/A movie review1987 Star Trek: Next Generation added nanotechnology to their movieN/Ascience fictionnanotech is being used in sci fi movie and is portrayed as futuristic (not many other sci fi references to nanotech in previous 2000 articles)
2000-87. Abate, T. 10/30/00. Biotechnology - It's Not Just for Pharmaceutical Firms Anymore. SFC. P. D1John Armstrong, retired IBM VP for technology; David Magnus, Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Rev. John Minogue, president of DePaul University; National Institutes of Health; Department of Energy; Geron Corp.; Richard Klausner, head of the National Cancer Institute; Bill Joy, chief scientist of Sun Microsystems"Concerned about a growing public backlash against the latest advances of science and technology, major research organizations are taking some preventative medicine." (D1)Scientists and researchers believe that facing hard ethical and social issues surrounding technology will help to "inoculate themselves against the kind of fear, misunderstanding and hostility that has greeted such things as genetically modified foods and Dolly, the cloned sheep." (D1)NASA and other companies are beginning to form task forces on ethics and technology to bridge the gap between pure science and social issues.cloning, internet surveillance, societal dynamics and impacts. Public understanding of science and technology Scientists need to take steps such as these to mold the social consciousness of nanoscience so that that public image of it isn't one of fear and apprehension. Scientists hope to counter voices such as Bill Joy, who says "'I may be working to create tools that will enable the technology that may replace our species.'" (D1)
2000-88. Boyd, R. 11/24/00. High-tech fears prompt scientists to ponder ethics. MH. P. 33AJohn Armstrong, retired IBM VP for technology; David Magnus, Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania; John Minogue, president of DePaul University; National Institutes of Health; Department of Energy; Geron Gorp.; Richard Klausner, head of the National Cancer Institute; Bill Joy, chief scientist of Sun Microsystems"Concerned about a growing public backlash against the latest advances of science and technology, major research organizations are taking some preventative medicine." (33A)Scientists and researchers believe that facing hard ethical and social issues surrounding technology will help to "inoculate themselves against the kind of fear, misunderstanding and hostility that has greeted such things as genetically modified foods and Dolly, the cloned sheep." (33A)NASA and other companies are beginning to form task forces on ethics and technology to bridge the gap between pure science and social issues.cloning, internet surveillance, societal dynamics and impacts, public understanding of science and technologyScientists need to take steps such as these to mold the social consciousness of nanoscience so that that public image of it isn't one of fear and apprehension. Scientists hope to counter voices such as Bill Joy, who says "'I may be working to create tools that will enable the technology that may replace our species.'" (33A)
2000-89. Boyd, R. 11/24/00. Scientists Act to Thwart Backlash. ATU. P. A14John Armstrong, retired IBM VP for technology; David Magnus, Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia; Rev. John Minogue, president of DePaul University; National Institutes of Health; Department of Energy; Geron Corp.; Richard Klausner, head of the National Cancer Institute; Bill Joy, chief scientist of Sun Microsystems"Concerned about a growing public backlash against the latest advances of science and technology, major research organizations are taking some preventative medicine." (A14)Scientists and researchers believe that facing hard ethical and social issues surrounding technology will help to "inoculate themselves against the kind of fear, misunderstanding and hostility that has greeted such things as genetically modified foods and Dolly, the cloned sheep." (A14)NASA and other companies are beginning to form task forces on ethics and technology to bridge the gap between pure science and social issues.cloning, internet surveillance, societal dynamics and impacts, public understanding of science and technologyScientists need to take steps such as these to mold the social consciousness of nanoscience so that that public image of it isn't one of fear and apprehension. Scientists hope to counter voices such as Bill Joy, who says "'I may be working to create tools that will enable the technology that may replace our species.'" (A14)
2000-90. Hall, C. 11/24/00. Big Development in the Lilliputian World of Nanotechnology/ Building machines invisible to the naked eye. SFC. P. A3Galen Stucky and other scientists at the University of California at Santa Barbara and in Japan; Carlo Montemagno, nanotech researcher at Cornell University; Norman Bartelt, materials physicist at Sandia; Hongjie Dai, Stanford University"Using an electron microscope two stories tall, a team of scientists at the University of California at Santa Barbara and in Japan unveiled weird three-dimensional images of finely etched glass" (A.3); Stucky's team developed the mathematical formulas needed to produce nanoscale images in 3-D, a system for making 'topographic maps' of structured glass." (A.3)Practical nanotech devices are a long way off, but these developments are laying the groundwork. The images "represent a new reality of chemical-trapping 'cages,' molecular pores and other structural elements as small as one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair." (A.3)medicine, environmentalism, materials manufacturing, computersThough nanotech is still in the experimentation phase, the work done now will be the basis for any practical applications of nanotechnology in the future.
2000-91. Chang, K. 11/25/00. Scientists Make a Bacteria-Size Machine work. NYT. P. A10Carl D. Montemagno, professor of biological engineering at Cornell University; Norman C. Bartelt, staff scientist at Sandia National LaboratoriesThe Cornell scientists reported that they "hooked up a tiny motor to a metal propeller and spun the propeller around at up to eight revolutions a second." (A.10); the Sandia scientists created a clump of tin that is pushed by chemical forces so that it "scurries around like an amoeba on a surface of copper, leaving behind a thin trail of bronze alloy." (A.10)"Since the motor draws its energy from the same organic molecules that power living cells, Dr. Montemagno suggests that scientists may one day be able to build robots much smaller than bacteria that will be able to repair cellular damage, manufacture medicines and attack cancer cells." (A.10)Bartelt's 'nanomotor' is "roughly as efficient as an automobile engine at converting chemical energy to mechanical horsepower." (A.10)medicine, nano-assemblyThese advances are moving nanotechnology "in a direction where the end point might actually be useful." (A.10)
2000-92. 12/4/00. Coming Up Next: Joining. TIME. P. 79Michael Francoeur, president of Joining Technologies; M.LT's Koichi MasubuchiNone listed -speculation"In the future… we will further refine the tools of intelligent robotic welding as well as employ 'virtual welding,' which will enable engineers to test new techniques" (79)Welding is moving to a state of refinement that it will be able to be applied on nanotechnology scales.weldingEven a seemingly mundane science such as welding will have huge implications when it comes to finally realizing many nanotech goals.
2000-93. Kher, U. 12/4/00. Coming up Next: Nanosurgery. TIME. P. 74NASA; The National Cancer InstituteNASA and the National Cancer Institute "plan to spend $12 million a year for the next three years to develop nanosensors… that will scan the body for the molecular signatures of cancer" (74)15 years from now, cancers and other diseases will be cured by nanotech sensors packed into an ingestible capsule."If engineered to carry drugs or genes, the sensors could treat cancers one cell at a time" (74)Medicine, economic development (investment), societal influenceLarge organizations are banking on nanotech yields soon, and are investing large amounts of money to back nanotech research.
2000-95. Davis, G. 12/8/00. Governor Picks UCSF Lead in Biomedicine/ Institute Will 'Help invent the future.' SFC. P. A31California Governor Gray DavisGovernor Davis "picked a consortium led by the University of California at San Francisco yesterday to spearhead a $900 million push to 'help invent the future.'" (A.31)Davis believes this program will help ensure "the birthplace of Silicon Valley and the biotechnology industry will not be left behind in 21st century sciences such as nanotechnology and gene-based medicine." (A.31)Economic development Nanotech and economic developmentAgain, substantial funds are being allocated for nanotechnology research and development.
2000-96. Markoff, J. 12/8/00. California Sets up 3 Centers for Basic Scientific Research. NYT. P. A30California Governor Gray DavisDavis "announced the establishment of three major research institutions dedicated to nanotechnology, biotechnology, and telecommunications and computing." (A.30)Davis believes this program will help to replicate the Silicon Valley entrepreneurial model.The nanotech portion of the funding will come in the form of the California Nanosystems InstituteBusiness, economic development and investmentAgain, substantial funds are being allocated for nanotechnology research and development.
2000-97. Weiss, K. 12/8/00. UCI to Share in $300-Million Grant. LA. P. B1California Governor Gray Davis; Scripps Research Institute; Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences; Stanford University"Gov. Gray Davis… awarded $300 million to three new University of California research institutes" (B.1)The three institutes will "expand the frontiers of science and technology." (B.1); Davis believes that "'these three institutes will invest in the 21st century and create the same dividends that Stanford Research Institute and Stanford did when it helped span the Silicon Valley.'" (Davis, B.1)None listedresearch, business, economic development, investmentMost see this as a positive step in nanotech research, but some critics warn that "profit motives could distort lab results or discourage researchers from sharing information that might prove to be lucrative." (B.1)
2000-98. Davis, G. 12/8/00. Davis Awards Science Funds. LA. P. B1California Governor Gray DavisDavis "awarded $300 million in tax dollars to three new University of California institutes… that will explore the frontiers of science and technology." (B.1)"'We believe that these three institutes will invest in the 21st century and create the same dividends that Stanford Research Institutes and Stanford did when it helped spawn the Silicon Valley.'" (Davis, B.1)The funding will be in the form of $25 million/year for 4 years, plus private industry funds.materials manufacturing, electronics, computers, medicine, automotive industry, economic development and investmentMost see this as a positive step in nanotech research, but some critics warn that "profit motives could distort lab results or discourage researchers from sharing information that might prove to be lucrative." (B.1)
2000-99. 12/11/00. News Summary. NYT. P. A2the semiconductor industryNone listed – summary of various semiconductor newsN/AAn industry meeting is scheduled for 12/11/00 to discuss nanotechnology and the microelectronics industrycomputers, electronicsNanotech is considered a central part of the semiconductor industry
2000-100. 12/11/00. Meeting to Study New Facets of Microelectronic Industry. NYT. P. C16NTT DoCoMo; Lucent Technologies; University of California; Intel CorporationPresentations at the International Electron Devices meeting will include: NTT DoCoMo - engineers will "describe transistors that can be switched on and off based on the movement of a single electron" (C.16); Lucent - researchers will present "a data storage technology concept in which information is stored in an aerosol of floating crystals as small as three nanometers... in diameter." (C.16); UCal - researchers have fabricated the smallest chip to date at 20-nanometers; Intel - researchers have scaled the transistor down to 30 nanometersIntel believes that "raw computer processing power will make possible computer applications that are well beyond the range of today's desktop machines." (C.16)Intel's transistor is so small that "a vertical pile of 30 million of the tiny electronic switches would measure only one-inch high." (C.16)electronics, computersThis type of collaboration will let rival companies overcome similar problems and advance nanoscience research considerably.
2000-101. 12/11/00. Business Digest. NYT. P. C1the semiconductor industryNone listed – summary of various semiconductor newsN/AAn industry meeting is scheduled for 12/11/00 to discuss nanotechnology and the microelectronics industrycomputers. ElectronicsNanotech is considered a central part of the semiconductor industry
2000-102. 12/13/00. California's Big Boost To Sceince and Research. SFC. P. A22California Governor Gray DavisDavis "announced the creation of three new University of California research institutes" designed to "expand the frontiers of science, medicine, and technology." (A.22)"'We believe that these three institutes will invest in the 21st century and create the same dividends that Stanford Research Institutes and Stanford did when it helped spawn the Silicon Valley.'" (Davis, A.22)The nanotech portion of the funding will come in the form of the California Nanosystems Institutematerials manufacturingAgain, substantial funds are being allocated for nanotechnology research and development.
2000-105. Jochnowitz, J. 12/15/00. $500M Edge for Biotech Goals. Albany Times Union. P. A1Senate Majority Leader Joseph BrunoGen-NY-sis 5 year plan: $225 million - State Grants, $45 million - tax incentives, $225 million - federal, industry, and academic fundingThe funding "'…is going to thrust us [NY] in a huge leap forward in [biotech] competition with other states.'" (A1); one of the primary future job markets will center around nanotechnology researchGen-NY-sis (Generating Employment Through New York Science) is a $500 million proposal "aimed at giving New York an edge in the national competition for biotechnology grants, businesses, and jobs." (A1)nanotechnology, biotechnologyProviding funding for biotechnology and nanotechnology will purportedly put NY back in a grant-holding leadership position. The goals of the funding are to create jobs, and to further nanotech and biotech research.
2000-106. Davis, G. 12/17/00. Hotbeds for Scientific Vision. LA. P. M4California Governor Gray Davis; UCLA; UC Santa BarbaraUCLA and the UC Santa Barbara will explore nanotechnology research using the funds allocated by DavisThe creation of these institutes will "demolish walls between scientific disciplines and thereby improve academic culture." (M.4)The nanotech portion of the funding will come in the form of the California Nanosystems Institutemedicine, materials manufacturing, economic developmentAgain, substantial funds are being allocated for nanotechnology research and development.
2000-107. Page, L. 12/18/00. From Well-Wired Offices, Musings on Tomorrow's Technologies. NYT. PC26Cyrus L. Harmon, general manager of AffymetrixNone listed – speculation "'Thirty years from now we will look back and see how nanotechnology has changed the world.'" (Cyrus, C.26)None listedmedicine, materials manufacturingNanoscience will revolutionize manufacturing in medicine and elsewhere.
2000-108. Ignatius, D. 12/21/00. Transition to the 21st Century. WP. P. B07The CIAThe CIA issued a study called 'Global Trends 2015.'Sciences such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, and materials science are noted 'wild cards' in the study.None listedSocietal issues and dynamics Even the CIA hasn't made a decision as to whether the supposed benefits of nanotechnology will outweigh the apparent risks.
2000-109. Hall, C. 12/26/00. Gene Map Just the Beginning/ A year of startling discoveries puts science on the path to new possibilities. SFC. P. A14Science journal"Scientists came up with the first live molecular-scale switch this year" (A.14)"The first practical applications of nanoscale science are not far off." (A.14)The nanotech light bulbs might be more expensive than regular bulbs, but they would never burn out.light bulbsNanotechnology made it onto the list of the top 10 most notable discoveries of 2000.
2000-110. Dinello, D. 12/28/00. Body Shopping Futurists Use the web to plan a world merging man, machine. CT. P. 5Eric Drexler; Nanotechnology magazineNone listed – speculation "Several 21st Century technologies -- prosthetics, biotechnology, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence and robotics -- may define a new era in human progress, the Post-Human Era." (5)Drexler's book "Engines of Creation" is available for free on The Foresight Institute Web Sitemedicine, computersNanotechnology may be one of the primary technologies that we will use to better ourselves and take the next evolutionary step for humanity.
2000-111. Klein, A. 12/30/00. Tomorrow's Forecast. Detroit Free Press. P. 3AEd Klobucher, World Future SocietyN/A - future speculationNanotechnology may become so advanced in the future that charcoal dust molecules may be arranged into diamonds.None listed molecular rearrangement, economic and social implications When and if this type of technology is developed, it will have serious implications on the world economies. When any material can be cheaply and easily mass-produced, our economies will have to shift to take this into account.
2000-112. Achenbach, J. 12/31/00. 2001 Ain't What It Used to Be. WP. P. B01Bill Joy, chief scientist for Sun Microsystems; '2001: A Space Odyssey'N/A - movie review"Technology is empowering, but it also bites back." (B.01)"Today's scientific breakthroughs involve biotechnology, genomics, photonics, nanotechnology" (B.01)Social implications / aspects of nanotechnology2001' gives a precedent for the dangers of our technology which ties in appropriately with Joy's disheartening prediction of the technological future.